The Prophet Muhammad () said,

"If a woman prays her five (daily prayers), fasts her month (i.e. Ramadan), guards her private parts, and obeys her husband, it will be said to her, ‘Enter Paradise through whichever of the gates of Paradise you wish.’" (Sahih Al-Bukhari)

Sahih Al Bukhari Vol No.1, Hadith No.42

"If any one of you improves in (following) ISLAM then his good deeds will be REWARDED ten times to seven hundred times for each good deed and a bad deed will be recorded as it is"

Al Qur’an 2:188

Do not eat up your property among yourselves for vanities, nor use it as bait for the judges, with intent that you may eat up wrongfully and knowingly a little of (other) people's property.

Al Qur’an 30:39

“Those who give Charity seeking the pleasure of Allah, they will find an increase there”

Sahih Bukhari Vol. No. 8, Hadith No. 6696

“Anyone who promises to obey Allah, he should obey Him. & anyone who promises disobedience to Allah he should not disobey Him”

Monday, October 21, 2013

Why should the wife obey her husband?

Question:
Why is it that when people get married the women has to do what the man says?

Answer:
Praise be to Allaah.

What the Muslim has to do when he learns the ruling of Islam is to submit to it and believe in it even if he does not know the wisdom behind it. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“It is not for a believer, man or woman, when Allaah and His Messenger have decreed a matter that they should have any option in their decision. And whoever disobeys Allaah and His Messenger, he has indeed strayed into a plain error”

[al-Ahzaab 33:36]

He should be certain that there is the utmost wisdom behind all the rulings of Islam, but that wisdom may be hidden and he may not understand it. In that case he should realize that this is due to his lack of knowledge and the shortcomings of human intellect, which is not free of defects.

When a man and a woman come together in marriage and live together, there are bound to be differences in opinion between them, and one party must have the final say in order to resolve the issue, otherwise the differences will multiply and disputes will increase. So there has to be someone in charge, otherwise the marriage will founder.

Hence Islam made the husband the protector and maintainer of the wife and gave him the responsibility of heading the household, because he is more perfect in rational thinking than her in most cases. This means that it is obligatory for her to obey him. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Men are the protectors and maintainers of women, because Allaah has made one of them to excel the other, and because they spend (to support them) from their means” [al-Nisaa’ 4:34]

Among the reasons for that are the following:

1 – Men are more able to bear this responsibility, just as women are more able than men to take care of the children and the household affairs. So each of them has his or her natural role and position.

2 – In Islam, men are obliged to spend on their wives; the wife does not have to work or earn a living. Even if she has an independent income or she becomes rich, the husband is still obliged to spend on her as much as she needs. Because he bears the responsibility of spending, he is made the protector and maintainer of his wife and is put in charge (of the household).

Hence we see chaos in the societies which go against that: men do not shoulder the responsibility of spending on their wives, and wives are not obliged to obey their husbands; they go out of the home whenever they want and leave the marital nest empty and neglect their children. A woman has to work hard even if that is at the expense of her house and family.

We should also take note of the following points:

1 – The woman will be rewarded by Allaah for her obedience to her husband.

2 – This obedience should not involve disobeying Allaah. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “There is no obedience to any created being if it involves disobedience towards the Creator.”

3 – Just as the husband has the right to be obeyed, Islam also tells him to treat his wife kindly. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“And they (women) have rights (over their husbands as regards living expenses) similar (to those of their husbands) over them (as regards obedience and respect) to what is reasonable”

[al-Baqarah 2:228]

So he should not mistreat or oppress her, or issue harsh commands to her. Rather he should deal with her in a wise manner, and tell her to do things which are in her interests, his interests and the interests of the household, in a kind and gentle manner.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The best of you is the one who is best to his wife, and I am the best of you to my wives.”.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

CARELESSNESS in RUKOO’ or EXAGGERATION therein


The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) commanded us to do RUKOO’ and SUJOOD perfectly and completely.

It was reported from Anas ibn Maalik (may Allaah be pleased with him) that he heard the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said : “Do your rukoo’ and sujood perfectly and completely, for by the One in Whose Hand is my soul, I can see you behind me when you do rukoo’ and sujood.”

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 6268; Muslim, 425)
__________________________________________________

Part of doing rukoo’ and sujood properly and correctly is to
BE AT EASE in both.

It was reported from Abu Hurayrah that a man entered the
mosque and prayed.

The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) was sitting in a corner of the mosque, and the man came
and greeted him with salaam.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him)
answered “ Wa ‘alayk (and also upon you).
GO BACK AND PRAY, for you have not prayed.”

So he went back and prayed, then he came and greeted the
Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) with salaam, and the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) answered, “Wa ‘alayk (and also upon you). Go back and pray, for you have not prayed yet.”

The third time this happened, the man said, “Teach me, O Messenger of Allaah.”

He said: “When you stand up to pray, do wudoo’ properly, then face the Qiblah and say ‘Allaahu akbar.’ Then recite whatever you can of Qur’aan. Then do rukoo’ until you are at ease in rukoo’. Then stand up until you are at ease in standing, then do sujood until you are at ease in sujood. Then sit up until you are sitting up straight. Do that throughout your prayer.”

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 724; Muslim, 397)

Not doing rukoo’ and sujood properly and completely is something which INVALIDATES ONE'S PRAYER.

It was reported that Abu Mas’ood al-Ansaari al-Badri said :
“The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said :

‘A prayer in which a person does not straighten his spine in his rukoo’ and sujood does not count.”

[Narrated by al-Tirmidhi, 265; he said it is hasan saheeh.
Also narrated by al-Nasaa’i, 1027; Abu Dawood, 855;
Ibn Maajah, 870]

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Fasting during pregnancy


Is fasting safe for my baby?
There's no clear answer. Despite research, we can't be sure that fasting is safe for you and your baby.

However, fasting in pregnancy appears to be safer for you and your baby if you feel strong and well enough, and if your pregnancy is going well.

If you don't feel well enough to fast, or are worried about your health or your baby's wellbeing, Islamic law gives you clear permission not to fast. Talk to your GP or midwife and get a general health check before deciding to fast.

One factor is when the fast takes place. If Ramadan coincides with summer, this means hot weather and long days, which puts you at greater risk of dehydration.


What do studies into fasting in pregnancy show?
Some studies show little or no effect on newborn babies whose mums fasted in pregnancy. Others suggest health problems later in life, or that fasting in pregnancy may have some effect on the intelligence or academic ability of a child.

Here’s what the research has told us so far:

The Apgar score of babies of women who fasted in pregnancy was no different from babies of women who didn't fast.
Fasting in pregnancy may cause a baby to have a lower birth weight, especially if the fasting took place in the first trimester. However, other studies found the difference in birth weight to be very small.
Babies born to mums who fasted either in pregnancy or at the time of conception may grow up to be slightly shorter and thinner. But again, this difference is very small.
The chemical balance of the blood changes when you fast. But the changes don't appear to be harmful to you or your baby.


There's some concern that fasting may affect how well a baby grows in the uterus (womb), or that fasting may be linked to premature labour. Some studies suggest that more babies are born early if their mums fast during Ramadan, though the country you live in also plays a part.

How will I cope with fasting?
If your weight and lifestyle are generally healthy you are likely to cope better with fasting. Your baby needs nutrients from you, and if your body has enough energy stores, fasting is likely to have less of an impact.

How your body deals with fasting will also depend on:

your general health before you became pregnant
your stage of pregnancy
the length of time you fast during the day


Fasting in the summer months is likely to be harder work for you than it would be in the winter due to the longer days and higher temperatures.


What do other women do?
According to some studies, about three quarters of pregnant Muslim women worldwide choose to fast for Ramadan. But everyone has their own way of observing Ramadan.

Most Islamic leaders say that you should fast if you are healthy enough to do so. But they also say that if you are unwell you mustn't fast. You shouldn't ignore this special permission if you feel unwell, or if you fear that fasting could harm you or your baby.

Only you can judge how healthy you feel, and what the right decision is for you. Talk to your family, midwife or doctor, and an Islamic sheikh, to help you to consider your options.


How should I prepare for fasting?
Plan ahead to make things easier during Ramadan:

Talk to your midwife, who can check your health and for any possible complications that fasting makes you more prone to, such as diabetes (gestational diabetes) and anaemia. You may need to have more frequent check-ups during your fast to monitor your blood sugar levels. Fasting is not considered to be safe if you have diabetes and are pregnant.
If you're used to having a lot of caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea and cola, cut back before you fast to prevent withdrawal headaches. You shouldn't have more than 200mg of caffeine a day when you are pregnant, which is about two cups of instant coffee. Remember that chocolate and green tea also contain some caffeine.
Talk to your employer about managing your work during Ramadan, whether through reducing your working hours or having extra breaks. Read more about working and fasting.
Your doctor, midwife or a dietitian can help you to work out your dietary needs.
Keep a food diary, so you know what you are eating and drinking.
Start preparing early by doing shopping and errands before you fast.


What warning signs should I look out for?
Contact your doctor as soon as possible if:

You're not putting on enough weight, or are losing weight. You probably won't be weighed during your antenatal appointments, so try to weigh yourself regularly at home while you are fasting.
You become very thirsty, are weeing less frequently, or if your wee becomes dark-coloured and strong-smelling. This is a sign of dehydration, and it can make you more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other complications.
You develop a headache or other pains, or a fever.
You become nauseous or start vomiting.


You should contact your doctor straight away if:

There is a noticeable change in your baby’s movements, such as if your baby is not moving around or kicking as much.

You notice contraction-like pains. This could be a sign of premature labour.

You feel dizzy, faint, weak, confused or tired, even after you have had a good rest. Break your fast immediately and drink water containing salt and sugar, or an oral rehydration solution such as Dioralyte, and contact the doctor.


How can I make fasting in pregnancy easier?

Keep calm and avoid stressful situations. Changes in your routine, a lack of food and water, and eating and drinking at different times, can cause stress. Pregnant women who fasted during Ramadan were found to have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood than women who didn't fast.
Take things easy, and accept help when it is offered. Even if your family and friends stay up late, you may need to mark this Ramadan with more quiet, restful time.
Ask family or friends who have fasted while being pregnant for tips and suggestions.
Keep cool, as you may become dehydrated quickly, which isn't good for you or your baby.
Plan your days so you can take regular rests.
Try not to walk long distances or carry anything heavy.
Cut down on housework and anything that tires you out.


What's the best way to break my fast?
Choose a variety of healthy foods and have plenty to drink at Suhoor (pre-dawn meal) and Iftar (meal taken at dusk). Have a healthy bedtime snack too, and set your alarm clock if you need to, so you don't miss your pre-dawn meal.

Choose foods that release energy slowly. Complex carbohydrates, such as wholegrains and seeds, and high-fibre foods, such as pulses, vegetables and dried fruits, will help to keep you going. This will also help to prevent constipation.
Avoid having lots of sugary foods that will raise your blood sugar levels quickly. Your blood sugar may then drop quickly, which may make you feel faint and dizzy.
Rather than high-fat, refined foods, choose healthier options such as potatoes or chickpeas.
Make sure you get plenty of protein from beans, nuts and well-cooked meat and eggs. This will help your baby to grow well.
Try to drink about 1.5 litres to 2 litres of water or other fluids between dusk and dawn, and avoid caffeinated drinks such as tea and coffee. Caffeine makes you lose more water when you wee, so you may be more likely to become dehydrated, especially if the weather is hot.


I'm still not sure if I should fast. What should I do?
Ask your midwife to give you a general health check before you begin. An Islamic sheikh will probably suggest getting medical advice to help you to make your decision. Consider trying a trial fast for a day or so, see how you feel, and then go back to your midwife or GP for a check-up.

Fasting during pregnancy


Is fasting safe for my baby?
There's no clear answer. Despite research, we can't be sure that fasting is safe for you and your baby.

However, fasting in pregnancy appears to be safer for you and your baby if you feel strong and well enough, and if your pregnancy is going well.

If you don't feel well enough to fast, or are worried about your health or your baby's wellbeing, Islamic law gives you clear permission not to fast. Talk to your GP or midwife and get a general health check before deciding to fast.

One factor is when the fast takes place. If Ramadan coincides with summer, this means hot weather and long days, which puts you at greater risk of dehydration.


What do studies into fasting in pregnancy show?
Some studies show little or no effect on newborn babies whose mums fasted in pregnancy. Others suggest health problems later in life, or that fasting in pregnancy may have some effect on the intelligence or academic ability of a child.

Here’s what the research has told us so far:

The Apgar score of babies of women who fasted in pregnancy was no different from babies of women who didn't fast.
Fasting in pregnancy may cause a baby to have a lower birth weight, especially if the fasting took place in the first trimester. However, other studies found the difference in birth weight to be very small.
Babies born to mums who fasted either in pregnancy or at the time of conception may grow up to be slightly shorter and thinner. But again, this difference is very small.
The chemical balance of the blood changes when you fast. But the changes don't appear to be harmful to you or your baby.


There's some concern that fasting may affect how well a baby grows in the uterus (womb), or that fasting may be linked to premature labour. Some studies suggest that more babies are born early if their mums fast during Ramadan, though the country you live in also plays a part.

How will I cope with fasting?
If your weight and lifestyle are generally healthy you are likely to cope better with fasting. Your baby needs nutrients from you, and if your body has enough energy stores, fasting is likely to have less of an impact.

How your body deals with fasting will also depend on:

your general health before you became pregnant
your stage of pregnancy
the length of time you fast during the day


Fasting in the summer months is likely to be harder work for you than it would be in the winter due to the longer days and higher temperatures.


What do other women do?
According to some studies, about three quarters of pregnant Muslim women worldwide choose to fast for Ramadan. But everyone has their own way of observing Ramadan.

Most Islamic leaders say that you should fast if you are healthy enough to do so. But they also say that if you are unwell you mustn't fast. You shouldn't ignore this special permission if you feel unwell, or if you fear that fasting could harm you or your baby.

Only you can judge how healthy you feel, and what the right decision is for you. Talk to your family, midwife or doctor, and an Islamic sheikh, to help you to consider your options.


How should I prepare for fasting?
Plan ahead to make things easier during Ramadan:

Talk to your midwife, who can check your health and for any possible complications that fasting makes you more prone to, such as diabetes (gestational diabetes) and anaemia. You may need to have more frequent check-ups during your fast to monitor your blood sugar levels. Fasting is not considered to be safe if you have diabetes and are pregnant.
If you're used to having a lot of caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea and cola, cut back before you fast to prevent withdrawal headaches. You shouldn't have more than 200mg of caffeine a day when you are pregnant, which is about two cups of instant coffee. Remember that chocolate and green tea also contain some caffeine.
Talk to your employer about managing your work during Ramadan, whether through reducing your working hours or having extra breaks. Read more about working and fasting.
Your doctor, midwife or a dietitian can help you to work out your dietary needs.
Keep a food diary, so you know what you are eating and drinking.
Start preparing early by doing shopping and errands before you fast.


What warning signs should I look out for?
Contact your doctor as soon as possible if:

You're not putting on enough weight, or are losing weight. You probably won't be weighed during your antenatal appointments, so try to weigh yourself regularly at home while you are fasting.
You become very thirsty, are weeing less frequently, or if your wee becomes dark-coloured and strong-smelling. This is a sign of dehydration, and it can make you more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other complications.
You develop a headache or other pains, or a fever.
You become nauseous or start vomiting.


You should contact your doctor straight away if:

There is a noticeable change in your baby’s movements, such as if your baby is not moving around or kicking as much.

You notice contraction-like pains. This could be a sign of premature labour.

You feel dizzy, faint, weak, confused or tired, even after you have had a good rest. Break your fast immediately and drink water containing salt and sugar, or an oral rehydration solution such as Dioralyte, and contact the doctor.


How can I make fasting in pregnancy easier?

Keep calm and avoid stressful situations. Changes in your routine, a lack of food and water, and eating and drinking at different times, can cause stress. Pregnant women who fasted during Ramadan were found to have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood than women who didn't fast.
Take things easy, and accept help when it is offered. Even if your family and friends stay up late, you may need to mark this Ramadan with more quiet, restful time.
Ask family or friends who have fasted while being pregnant for tips and suggestions.
Keep cool, as you may become dehydrated quickly, which isn't good for you or your baby.
Plan your days so you can take regular rests.
Try not to walk long distances or carry anything heavy.
Cut down on housework and anything that tires you out.


What's the best way to break my fast?
Choose a variety of healthy foods and have plenty to drink at Suhoor (pre-dawn meal) and Iftar (meal taken at dusk). Have a healthy bedtime snack too, and set your alarm clock if you need to, so you don't miss your pre-dawn meal.

Choose foods that release energy slowly. Complex carbohydrates, such as wholegrains and seeds, and high-fibre foods, such as pulses, vegetables and dried fruits, will help to keep you going. This will also help to prevent constipation.
Avoid having lots of sugary foods that will raise your blood sugar levels quickly. Your blood sugar may then drop quickly, which may make you feel faint and dizzy.
Rather than high-fat, refined foods, choose healthier options such as potatoes or chickpeas.
Make sure you get plenty of protein from beans, nuts and well-cooked meat and eggs. This will help your baby to grow well.
Try to drink about 1.5 litres to 2 litres of water or other fluids between dusk and dawn, and avoid caffeinated drinks such as tea and coffee. Caffeine makes you lose more water when you wee, so you may be more likely to become dehydrated, especially if the weather is hot.


I'm still not sure if I should fast. What should I do?
Ask your midwife to give you a general health check before you begin. An Islamic sheikh will probably suggest getting medical advice to help you to make your decision. Consider trying a trial fast for a day or so, see how you feel, and then go back to your midwife or GP for a check-up.

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Duaa for clear speech

  


Rabbi-shrahli sadri. Wa yassirli amri. Wa-hlul ‘uqdatamin lisani. Yafqahu qawli:  My Rabb! Expand for me my breast, and make my affair easy for me, and release the knot from my tongue, so they may understand my speech. Qur’an: Surah Ta’ha 20: 25-28
 
Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) asked Musa (alaihi salaam- may peace be upon him) to go to Pharoah and preach about Islam. Musa (alaihi salaam), because he had a stammering problem, thought he would not be able to speak to Pharoah and his people. He thought people would not understand him, so he prayed to Allah with this du’a to cure him from his speech problem and make it easy for people to understand him.
 
We may not have stammering problem, but many times we cannot properly express our ideas. Sometimes what we say does not make sense to others, or does not come out right. This du’a teaches us to pray to Allah to make our thoughts and speech clear so that other people may understand us.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Pre-Ramadan Checklist


1) Prepare Eid Clothes (so you don't waste time in Ramadan shopping for them)

2) Prayer Clothes (Buy/ make new ones or wash, iron and perfume existing ones)

3) Prayer Place (Dedicate a space in your home for your daily worship - clean, tahhir and 'attar it, and stock it up with all you need for your ibadah) For sisters in particular!

4) Menu! (Plan meals, whose turn it is to cook, and who you will be doing iftar for on different days)

5) Ibadah schedule/ targets (plan your qada, your daily schedule - plan how to fit it in, so that you will fit it in)

6) Du’a List (make a list of who you need to make du’a for during the month so during those busy days you don’t forget any one)

7) Donation preparation - prepare the stuff you will donate

8) Ta’zil ie/ Super-Spring Cleaning (clean, tahhir and gut out your rooms/house before the month to make it welcoming and comfortable for the angels )

9. Plan your invitations (family, friends, inlaws) and send out the invites. Do it in the first two thirds - preferably when you don't have prayer and make it clear that you will not be accepting any invitations the last third.

10. If you are working on a khatm of the qur'an finish quickly so you can start afresh in Ramadan.

11. Tie up loose ends socially. Make up with those you are not speaking to. Get on the good side of parents, in laws and husband.

12. Start cutting down on coffee if you are a heavy drinker.

13. Prepare children, discuss Ramadan routine with family, discuss excitement and looking forward to Ramadan with those younger people you see.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Is it allowed in Islam to wear GOLD Anklet in foot?


Allah Subhanah has permitted the believing woman to wear gold ornaments;  and there is absolutely no harm if she wears them on her hands,  her feet,  or even on her head if she wishes to do so! However, these anklets should not emit any sound that may attract strange men. (Fataawa Mahmoodiyah vol.5 pg.127)  


Whatever written of Truth and benefit is only due to Allah’s Assistance and Guidance, and whatever of error is of me.  Allah Alone Knows Best and He is the Only Source of Strength.
 

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Athan (Azan) Software

         

Assalamu Alaikum!

Athan (Azan) 4.4 allows you to hear automatic Athan (Azan) at the right time five times a day on every prayer time. Most Accurate Prayer times, Qiblah direction, Hijri Islamic Calendar, and many beautiful Athan (Azan, Adhan) sounds. More than 10 Million Athan Downloads Worldwide. The most popular religious software according to download.com

You may download Athan (Azan) Software from the following direct link.

http://athan.islamicfinder.org/athan/basic/AthanBasic.exe

Please forward the Athan (Azan) software to all the Muslim brothers and sisters you know..

Installation Help:

·  During installation, if you get a message saying "insert disk#2" then it means the file did not download completely and you need to download the file again from http://www.islamicfinder.org/athanDownload.php

·  If you get a error message "File Already Open" or "File Access Error" or "Run-Time error '75' File/Path access problem" after installation then please right click the installtion folder "C:\Progam Files\Athan", a popup menu will open, click on "properties" and select "Sharing" tab and make it "shared" to access other users of this computer.

·  After installation, please select your city in the Athan software.

·  Please always make sure that your computer date and time are accurate because the prayer times depend on your computer date and time.

·  After installing the program, if you have any further question then please check the "Help" available with the Athan (Azan) software.

·  If your question is not present in the "Help" section then contact us at http://www.islamicfinder.org/contactus.php



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Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Plucking of eyebrows and shaving off hair from arms and legs..IS IT HARAAAM?



Question:
I have come across various Islamic articles & write-ups that have spoken against shaving of hair on eyebrows amongst other areas of the body. I however need clarification on this does this shaving refer to TOTAL shaving? Am I allowed to reduce the amount of hair by mere shaping ? I have very bushy eyebrows that need trimming as it makes my face look crowded.
Answer:

Praise be to Allaah.  
We will quote for you the fatwas issued by the scholars concerning the ruling on removing hair from the eyebrows and hair from the rest of the body. 
Shaykh Ibn 'Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: "If removing hair from the eyebrows is done by plucking, this is namas (plucking the eyebrows) and the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) cursed the naamisah (the woman who plucks eyebrows) and the mutanammisah (the woman who has her eyebrows plucked). This is a major sin, and women are singled out in this ruling because they are the ones who usually do this, for the purpose of beautification, but if a man were to do it he would also be cursed, just as a woman is cursed for doing this, Allaah forbid. 
If hair is removed from the eyebrows by a method other than plucking, such as by cutting or shaving, some of the scholars regard this as being the same as plucking, because it is changing the creation of Allaah, so there is no difference between plucking, cutting or shaving. This is undoubtedly more on the safe side, so a person must avoid that, whether man or woman." 
(Quoted from Fataawa 'Ulama' al-Balad al-Haraam, p. 577) 
 The following question was mentioned in Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa'imah (5/196): 
A young woman has very thick eyebrows that make her look bad. This girl was forced to shave part of the area between the eyebrows and to reduce the rest so that she will look acceptable to her husband. 
The Committee replied: 
"It is not permissible to shave the eyebrows or reduce then, because that is the namas (plucking) for which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) cursed the one who does it and the one who asks for it to be done. What you must do is repent and pray for forgiveness for what you have done in the past, and beware of that in the future. 
Another question (5/195) was put to the Committee: 
Namas means removing some of the hair of the eyebrows, and is not permitted, because the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) cursed the woman who plucks her eyebrows and the one who has that done, but it is permissible for a woman to remove a beard or moustache, if one grows, or hair from her legs or arms." 
The hadeeth which says that the woman who plucks the eyebrows or who has that done is cursed was narrated by al-Bukhaari (4886) and Muslim (2125), from the hadeeth of 'Abd-Allaah ibn Mas'ood (may Allaah be pleased with him). 
The point is that it is haraam to remove any hair from the eyebrows, whether all the hair is removed by shaving, or some of it is removed by cutting. Anything apart from that is permissible, such as removing hair from the arms and legs, and the area between the eyebrows... The following appeared in Fataawa al-Lajnah (5/197): 
Question: What is the ruling on plucking the hair between the eyebrows? 
Answer: It is permissible to pluck it, because it is not part of the eyebrows. 
And Allaah knows best.




Tuesday, April 02, 2013

What is the ruling on men wearing white gold or platinum ring?

Praise be to Allaah.
Gold is in fact yellow in colour. It may be also described as red because of having some copper mixed with it in most cases. This is what is well known among people and is mentioned in books about language, metals etc. 
In al-Mu’jam al-Waseet it says: Gold is a metal that is yellow in colour. 
Professor Muhammad Husayn Joodi said in his book ‘Uloom al-Dhahab wa’l-Siyaaghat al-Mujawharaat (Sciences of gold and jewels): It is well known that every kind of metal that is used in making ingots, such as copper, silver, palladium, platinum, zinc etc have an obvious effect on the ingot’s colour, hardness and melting point. Gold gives a yellow colour and prevents oxidization of the ingot. Copper gives the ingot a red colour and makes it stronger and harder. "

In Islam, males are prohibited from wearing any kind of gold jeweleries (that includes ring). Based on a hadith told by Ahmad, Abu Daud, Nasa'i, Ibnu Hibban and Ibnu Majah:
"Rasulullah SAW took silk and he puts it on his right shoulder and he puts gold on his left shoulder, and said: Both of these are forbidden for my male people" 
Ibnu Majah also adds:
"but it is allowed for females"

Rasulullah SAW also had seen a man wearing a gold ring on his finger, but he suddenly pulled it away from his hand and threw it on the ground.
Then he said:
 Any one of you is deliberately taking hot coals and then he put in his hand. After the Prophet wentto the men is said'Take it and make use of the ring.' He answered'No!By Allah, I shall not take the ring that was removed by the Prophet. '"(Narrated by Muslim)

After consulting experts in the field of gemology and metallurgy, they said that the phrase “white gold” may be applied to a number of things: 
1 – It is applied to the metal platinum. It is permissible for men to wear it and there is no sin in that, because there is nothing in sharee’ah to suggest that it is forbidden for men. The fact that people call it white gold does not make it haraam, because it is just a name that is given to it, but it is not really gold. Similarly, cotton is also called “white gold” and oil is called “black gold”, because it is precious, but that does not make it haraam either. And it is permissible for men to wear precious stones such as diamonds, rubies etc. 
It says in Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah li’l-Ifta’ (24/76): We do not know of anything wrong with men wearing diamonds, if they are pure and there is no gold or silver with them. End quote. 
2 – The name white gold is given to the well-known yellow gold, but it is plated with a layer of platinum. Wearing this is haraam for men, because wearing it means he is wearing yellow gold, and wearing gold is haraam for men according to scholarly consensus, as was mentioned by Imam al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) in Sharh Saheeh Muslim. 
3 – The name white gold is given to regular yellow gold that is mixed with a specific percentage of platinum or another metal, of which more or less is added, depending on the standard of gold desired. This usage is very well known in stores selling gold. 
What it means, according to the experts, is that in order to prepare a kilogram of 21 carat gold, you mix 875 grams of pure (24 carat) gold with 125 grams of silver and copper. If you add the same amount (125 grams) of platinum instead of copper and silver, you will have a kilogram of white 21 carat gold. 
In order to make a kilogram of 18 carat gold, you mix 750 grams of pure gold with 250 grams of silver and copper. If we add the same amount (250 grams) of platinum instead of the silver or copper, we will get a kilogram of white 18 carat gold… and so on. 
In a press release issued by the Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on 22/3/1410 AH, which spoke of mineral resources (gold) in the Kingdom, it says: 
“White gold” refers to a mixture of gold with 12% platinum or 15% nickel. The colour of the gold may be made pinkish by adding 5% silver or 20% copper. A greenish colour may be achieved by mixing 75% gold with 25% silver, or mixing it with zinc and cadmium. A bluish colour may be achieved by mixing the gold with a small amount of iron. If the gold is mixed with 20% aluminium the resulting colour will be purple. The degree of redness in the gold may be controlled by increasing or decreasing the amount of copper that is added. End quote. 
Professor Dr. Mamdooh ‘Abd al-Ghafoor Hasan said in his book Mamlakat al-Ma’aadin (the Kingdom of metals): Pure gold is not hard enough to be used for making jewellery, but it may be mixed with copper, silver, nickel or platinum to make it harder, which at the same time gives it distinctive colours. A little copper makes it more reddish in colour, and silver make it more whitish. Adding 25% platinum or 15% nickel produces an ingot that is called “white gold.” 
To sum up: gold is originally yellow in colour, and there is no gold that is white in colour, rather other metals may be added to it that change its colour to white. 
So white gold is nothing more than yellow gold, but platinum has been added to it, instead of silver or copper. Hence in the stores the white gold has exactly the same standards as yellow gold. It is well known that adding silver or copper to gold does not alter the fact that it is gold, and it is does not make it permissible to use it. That also applies to adding palladium to it. 
Based on this, wearing white gold is haraam for men, because in fact it is yellow gold, but something had been added to it to change its colour to white. 
The Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas was asked: It has become common among some people, especially men, to use that which is called white gold, which is used to make watches, rings, pens and so on. After asking the jewellers and goldsmiths, we found out that white gold is actually the well-known yellow gold, to which a certain metal has been added, 5-10%, to change its colour from yellow to white, or some other colour, which makes it look like another kind of metal. Use of this has become very widespread in  recent times, and many people are confused about using it. 
They replied: 
If the situation is as described, the gold which is mixed with other metals still comes under the ruling that it is haraam to differentiate in weight or measure when selling it for gold of the same type, and the exchange must be completed in one sitting, whether it is sold for gold of the same type or for silver or cash. It is haraam for men to wear it, and it is haraam to make vessels out of it. Calling it white gold does not change these rulings. "
Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah (24/60) 


What is Platinum?

Platinum  is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78.Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River".It is a densemalleableductileprecious, gray-white transition metal. Even though it has six naturally occurring isotopes, platinum is one of the rarest elements in the Earth's crust and has an average abundance of approximately 5 μg/kg. It is the least reactive metal. It occurs in some nickel and copperores along with some native deposits, mostly in South Africa, which accounts for 80% of the world production. ( 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platinum)

Clearly from this explanation, it is wrong to deduce that platinum and white gold are the same.
Conclusion:  
Lawful for a man wearing a platinum BUT it is illegal for him to wear white goldBut still,silver are truly made for men, because it is the sunnah of the Prophet as well.

And Allaah knows best.

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